Tuesday, 2 April 2013

Continental

Todays post is one of continental subspecies. Last weeks Stonechat appears to show a white rump thanks to an observant watcher who got photos. This allied with the decent collar points towards nominate rubicola as opposed to British and near continent hibernans. I managed a few photos and videos so click on the youtube links and peruse at your pleasure.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USMnkMwUE6E&feature=youtu.be

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkX3-afKdSE&feature=youtu.be

You can just see that white rump peeking out.
The other interesting bird I saw was a Song Thrush which appeared normal until it flew when it showed a grey rump. No as obvious as on a Fieldfare but pretty striking nonetheless. It was the first one I had consciously seen although I am sure many others have passed me by during proper migration periods. Talking of migration...nah, no proper migrants. I slogged round the south of the site and not much was in evidence - a single Curlew, Buzzard & female Sparrowhawk. Calling in at the pine plantation got me the first of two patch ticks today, a fine male Siskin. I spent too long fannying around and missed the photo oppo. Nevermind - he was smart though and amongst the first Goldfinches that I have seen there for a while. 


Offshore the first proper assemblages of Red-throated Divers have started with 34 present between Barmston & Ulrome. When I arrived the tide was high so I headed south but by the time I got back to the car it had receded significantly and there were thousands of gulls and waders to the north of the camp site. Nothing unusual amongst the gulls could be picked out as a chav walked the tideline. He did however push all the waders along to me. The throng contained Dunlin, Sanderling, Knot, Grey Plover, Turnstone, Purple Sandpiper, Redshank and Bar-tailed Godwit. 4 first winter Kittiwakes were also involved, scoffing hurridly. All very smart. Here is a video of the waders working along.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EhDvi9Y9pw&feature=youtu.be

Species number 90 for the patch challenge. What will 100 be?
 Another birder was asking about the Jack Snipe so I gave him a tour of their favoured spots and on cue one popped up along with 2 Common Snipe. They are far too fast for me and my camera sadly... As we wandered back old faithful floated past the clifftop showing some dark looking coverts.

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